Preparing Homes for Wildfire

This is some good advice for protecting your home from fire

What are the primary threats to homes during a wildfire?

Research around home destruction vs. home survival in wildfires point to embers and small flames as the main way that the majority of homes ignite in wildfires. Embers are burning pieces of airborne wood and/or vegetation that can be carried more than a mile through the wind can cause spot fires and ignite homes, debris and other objects.

There are methods for homeowners to prepare their homes to withstand ember attacks and minimize the likelihood of flames or surface fire touching the home or any attachments. Experiments, models and post-fire studies have shown homes ignite due to the condition of the home and everything around it, up to 200’ from the foundation. This is called the Home Ignition Zone (HIZ).

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Wildfire/Preparing-homes-for-wildfire

We follow these procedures where we could, adding rainbird sprinklers on our roof connected to and NID water line with 85lbs of pressure. The water cone covered the roof and the desks around the house. We received excellent ratings from CalFire and USAA Insurance.

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About Russ Steele

Freelance writer and climate change blogger. Russ spent twenty years in the Air Force as a navigator specializing in electronics warfare and digital systems. After his service he was employed for sixteen years as concept developer for TRW, an aerospace and automotive company, and then was CEO of a non-profit Internet provider for 18 months. Russ's articles have appeared in Comstock's Business, Capitol Journal, Trailer Life, Monitoring Times, and Idaho Magazine.
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2 Responses to Preparing Homes for Wildfire

  1. Hifast says:

    Reblogged this on HiFast News Feed.

    Like

  2. Hifast says:

    One of the best videos showing a test of a typical home constructed inside a warehouse. Ember generators and fans blowing embers onto the test home built with varying materials. One of the biggest lessons is the attic vent allowing embers to enter the home.

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